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Daily Online Update, Tuesday – April 10, 2012

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Alaska/Pacific Coast

 

Sitka sac roe fishery pauses after half of limit caught

JUNEAU EMPIRE, April 10, 2012

After a Sunday harvest of approximately 3,700 tons, the Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery stood down Monday after an Alaska Department of Fish & Game flyover found insufficient biomass near Goddard Hot Springs.

http://juneauempire.com/local/2012-04-10/sitka-sac-roe-fishery-pauses-after-half-limit-caught#.T4Sqg1FSlfc

 

VIDEO: H2B Visa woes could cripple domestic seafood processing industry

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [Video] by John Sackton - April 9, 2012
Changes in the H2B visa program that make it less flexible, more costly, and raise prevailing wages by 30% or more, could end up driving thousands of jobs out of the US processing industry, especially on the East and Gulf Coasts. Here small companies rely on foreign workers who return often to the same plants year after year; the changes in the program make using these workers more difficult. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=sQtODwRPpPE

 

 

Politics

 

Former judge likely to keep his Alaska Board of Fisheries seat

Residency doesn't derail last Fish Board hearing.

Anchorage Daily News,  April 10th, 2012
JUNEAU -- Retired Superior Court Judge Karl Johnstone's reappointment to the Alaska Board of Fisheries advanced through his last confirmation hearing Monday with questions about his residency still an issue but apparently not serious enough to cause much trouble.

http://www.adn.com/2012/04/09/2414943/ex-judge-one-step-closer-to-keeping.html

 

GOP's Santorum ends presidential campaign

ADN: April 10th, 2012

Rick Santorum suspended his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination Tuesday, bowing to the inevitability of Mitt Romney's nomination and ending his improbable, come-from-behind quest to become the party's conservative standard-bearer in the fall.

http://www.adn.com/2012/04/10/2415876/santorum-suspends-campaign-for.html

 

 

International

 

Russia may expand mandatory catch certification from Barents Sea to Far East

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS by Eugene Gerden April 10, 2012
The Russian government is considering introducing a mandatory certification of catches of Russian fishermen, in an attempt to gain additional revenue for the Russian budget, and to make another action against poachers, who illegally supplying hundreds of tons of fish and seafood to the Asia-Pacific countries. ??

There is a possibility that the certificates will be issued to indicate the legality of seafood, caught by Russian fishermen and shipped to the Asia-Pacific region.

?Andrei Krayniy, head of Russian Federal Fisheries Agency, comments: 
"The system of the compulsory catch certification, which was tested in the
North Atlantic has shown to be effective and we would like to use such practice in the Russian Far East. We are currently continuing negotiations on the signing of appropriate agreements with Japan and China.
?
He also added that the adoption of the mandatory certification system will attract additional profits to the state treasury, which could reach RUB 30 billion (USD$1 billion) per year, as a duty on the imports of Russian seafood to the Asia-Pacific region. Currently the illegal exports of crabs alone from
Russia is estimated at US $800 million.
?
At the same time most of Russian analysts have already criticized the initiative of the Russian government, believing that it could negatively affect the profits of the Russian fishery companies. 
?According to German Zverev, president of the Russian Association of Pollock Producers, Russian fisherman already pay customs duties, as a result of a recent introduction of mandatory delivery of catches in the customs territory of Russia, which are estimated at about RUB 5 billion (US $150 million), while the new fee is expected to be six times higher of the already existing ones. 

Zverev also believes that references to the
North Atlantic experience are unfounded, due to the fact that neither the U.S. nor Canada, nor Iceland or the Faroe Islands use the system of catch certification.
?
Russian analysts also believe that the new measure will not be efficient against poaching, while one of the most important goals of the Russian government in the field of the domestic fishery business in the near future should be the protection of the national pollock market against the ever growing expansion of Japanese, Chinese and South Korean companies. 

 

 

 

FYI’s

 

NOAA Fisheries News:

 

NPFMC – Items from the March/April meeting:

  • Halibut CSP motion 4/12
  • Bering Sea Canyons motion 4/12
  • EFH Consultation Policy motion 4/12
  • Chum PSC motion 4/12

 

77 FR 210086, April 9, 2012

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council Golden King Crab Price Formula Committee is meeting in Seattle, WA, April 26–27, 2012.

 

Blog/Commentary:

National Ocean Policy: Bad for coastal economies

By Rep. Steve Southerland, II (R-Fla.), The Hill - 04/05/12

Growing up on Northwest Florida’s Gulf Coast, there were always certain constants in the Southerland household. Among those were faith, family, and–of course–fishing.

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/energy-a-environment/220211-national-ocean-policy-bad-for-coastal-economies

 

As US seafood profits from globalization national marketing program could save domestic industry

SEAFOOD.COM NEWS [commentary by Dick Gutting] April 9, 2012
Richard Gutting writes the import alert newsletter for Urner Barry's Foreign Trad Data, and is a former president of the National Fisheries Institute. His opinion piece after the Congressional hearing on fisheries jobs is reprinted here.
The
U.S. seafood market is being pulled in opposite directions — one towards a low-cost commodity market for imported products --- the other towards a specialty or niche market for “local food”. This division offers new business opportunities for individual companies --- and a political opportunity for our industry to work together. The mass market accounts for more than 80 percent of seafood sales. It is based upon frozen products from many countries, which are competing fiercely with each other on price. The specialty market is limited by production and geography. It depends upon a high per-pound price for the uniqueness of local product, and has grown in response to consumer interest in nutrition, the environment, and a healthy lifestyle. The mass market has been fueled by the global expansion of new farming systems, upgraded foreign processing under HACCP, lower U.S. tariffs, and more efficient global supply chains. Price competition is fierce --- driving prices down and raising consumer demand. Domestic producers and the processors they supply have been struggling. U.S. fishing fleets have shrunk, growth in domestic farming has stalled, and processing plants have turned to imports or have been forced offshore to other countries. NOAA's policy to reduce fleets with individual vessel quotas is accelerating these trends. Big companies are getting bigger and multinational --- and smaller domestic companies are going out of business. Frustrations have been palpable --- but street demonstrations against NOAA officials and attacking imports with antidumping tariffs, new labeling restrictions, and allegations of food-safety violations are not solving the underlying problem of lost jobs, profits and tax revenues for local communities. More than a decade ago seafood leaders and marketing experts suggested a solution to domestic producers. Gain better prices by targeting high-end niche markets with high-quality products that appeal to consumers who want “local food”. A few fishermen and farmers have attempted this at farmer markets and local high-end restaurants and retailers --- with some success. But establishing programs that make a real difference to fishing fleets and rural communities have been frustrated by a lack of organization at the grassroots level, and anger about imports. 
Political winds, however, are shifting. A nation-wide coalition of domestic organizations and companies has coalesced around a plan to market seafood, which they presented to the U.S. Senate Oceans Caucus last week. You can watch the hearing testimony below.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5dfixn7WO0&feature=player_embedded.

Here's an opportunity for importers, domestic producers and government agencies like NOAA to work together --- and benefit everyone.
Richard E. Gutting, Jr.

Nancy Diaz

Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper

Pacific Seafood Processors Association

1900 W Emerson Place Suite 205,

Seattle, WA 98119

Phone: 206.281.1667

E-mail: nancy@pspafish.net

Website: www.pspafish.net

Our office days/hours are Monday-Friday

8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.