Alaska/Pacific Coast

Hatchery chum release approved near Petersburg
KFSK by Joe Viechnicki – January 4, 2017
A Sitka-based hatchery organization has been granted approval for a new remote release site for chum salmon in Thomas Bay on the mainland near Petersburg. The hatchery chums, traditionally released closer to Sitka, could be an early season opportunity for commercial seiners and gillnetters. But the location has been a concern for commercial trollers and sport fishermen.
http://www.kfsk.org/2017/01/04/hatchery-chum-release-approved-near-petersburg/

Council cracks up over catch shares
Alaska Journal of Commerce by DJ Summers – January 5, 2017
Everyone in the Gulf of Alaska agrees on one thing: it was the other side’s fault.
Depending on who you ask, catch shares are evil incarnate or an angel of good management. Depending on who you ask, they’ll either save Kodiak or kill it.
http://www.alaskajournal.com/2017-01-05/council-cracks-over-catch-shares#.WG-1pZJOFA4

Sustainability is fisheries priority
Stutes’ list includes budgets, permit fees, transboundary waterways and more
Cordova Times by Margaret Bauman – January 6, 2017
In the upcoming legislative session, the House Special Committee on Fisheries will focus on sustainability and how the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and others are contributing to it, says Rep. Louise Stutes, R-Kodiak, committee chair.
http://www.thecordovatimes.com/2017/01/06/sustainability-is-fisheries-priority/

Outsider kings dominating harvest
New study shows Chinooks caught in westward region commercial and Kodiak area sport fisheries are from BC, US West Coast
Cordova Times by Margaret Bauman – January 6, 2017
Alaska caught, yes indeed.
Still, most of the Chinook salmon harvested in Westward Region commercial and Kodiak area sport fisheries from 2014 through 2016 were from the West Coast of the United States and British Columbia.
http://www.thecordovatimes.com/2017/01/06/outsider-kings-dominating-harvest/

Oregon Dungeness Crabbers, Processors Return to Price Negotiations
SEAFOODNEWS.COM – January 5, 2017
Fishermen and processors in Oregon have returned to the state-supervised negotiating table in Newport, Ore., in an effort to end a strike by fishermen over Dungeness crab ex-vessel prices.

Crabbers in several ports from California to Washington have objected to a drop in an ex-vessel price that coincided with Oregon and Washington opening the majority of their coasts to crab seasons. Many point to Pacific Seafood for the drop in prices. However, crabbers have been united in their desire for $3 a pound from any processor, which in Oregon was negotiated during the first part of the season for the opening in the southern part of the state. The Oregon Department of Agriculture supervised those negotiations before the holidays.

Absent Oregon’s state-supervised price negotiations, fishermen must negotiate with the individual processors they sell to for an ex-vessel price. Each processor has its own business plan.

“Pacific Seafood is just one of many buyers along the coast, and along with harvesters, processors, grocers and restaurants, we are all in this together,” Dan Occhipinti of Pacific Seafood General Counsel said in a statement on Wednesday to KOMO News.

“Buyers and sellers each have to decide what they think the market will support,” said Occhipinti. “It can be challenging to find the right balance, but we’re confident that at the end of the day, consumers will get wholesome, sustainably harvested Dungeness crab at a price they can afford.”

At several ports, processing employees were loading crab pots on vessels, as crabbers anticipated the strike ending soon.

At the same time, the OregonDepartment of Agriculture wanted to continue to test for domoic acid levels in crab as the Dungeness season progressed. But as the fishermen’s strike goes into another week, no tests have been done as fishermen have not harvested crab.

The Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission asked for volunteer boats to retrieve some crab this week so the state can monitor domoic acid levels. Vessels should be leaving ports this week during a break in the weather to retrieve samples.
http://www.seafoodnews.com/Story/1046362/Oregon-Dungeness-Crabbers-Processors-Return-to-Price-Negotiations

Politics

Murkowski Sworn in to Fourth Term as U.S. Senator
Announces Committee Assignments for the 115th Congress
Alaska Business Magazine – January 3, 2017
Office of US Senator Lisa Murkowski
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) released the following statement as she was sworn in to her fourth term as U.S. Senator:
http://www.akbizmag.com/Government/Murkowski-Sworn-in-to-Fourth-Term-as-US-Senator/

Sullivan Announces Committee Assignments for the 115th Congress
Alaska Business Magazine – January 3, 2017
Office of US Senator Dan Sullivan
WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Senator Dan Sullivan (R-AK) today announced that he has been selected to serve on four U.S. Senate committees for the 115th Congress.
http://www.akbizmag.com/Government/Sullivan-Announces-Committee-Assignments-for-the-115th-Congress/

International

UN Report Outlines Uncertainties in Fish Projections
Fishermen’s News – January 4, 2017
Changes in the environment, resources, macroeconomic conditions and more may influence production and fish markets in the coming decade, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization’s 2016 state of world fisheries report.
http://fnonlinenews.blogspot.com/2017/01/un-report-outlines-uncertainties-in.html

FYI’s

Here’s Even More Evidence That Fish Oil Is Good for You
Time by Alice Park – January 3, 2017
A large review of studies finds benefits for the heart, but the data isn’t conclusive yet
Doctors and health officials have long urged the public to eat more fish, since the healthy fats in fish—primarily from the omega-3 family—tend to lower risk of heart attacks and other heart problems. In fact, the most recent dietary guidelines recommend that Americans eat more fatty fish per week. (About half of Americans don’t eat any fish at all, or consume it only occasionally.)
http://time.com/4619488/omega-3-fats-heart-health/

It is almost impossible to herd cats, thanks to evolution
Domestic cats just do not see any benefits from group living, but in the future that could change
BBC by Jane Palmer – January 4, 2017
How hard can it really be to herd cats?
Ask Daniel Mills, professor of veterinary behavioural medicine at the University of Lincoln, UK. In a recent study, Mills and his colleague Alice Potter demonstrated that cats are more autonomous and solitary than dogs. Carrying out the research for the project was as difficult as the cat’s reputation might suggest.
http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170103-it-is-almost-impossible-to-herd-cats-thanks-to-evolution

Ann Owens
Pacific Seafood Processors Association
Office Manager
1900 W Emerson Place Suite 205, Seattle, WA 98119
Phone: 206.281.1667
E-mail: pspafish@gmail.com; Website: www.pspafish.net
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January 6, 2017