Alaska/Pacific Coast

The Alaska Fisheries Report
KMXT by Jay Barrett – May 19, 2016
This week: Seattlites go crazy over Copper River salmon, we have the Yukon’s salmon outlook for this summer, and how will the humpies run in Southeast? All that, and AIFMA is no more, coming up on the Alaska Fisheries Report. We had help this week from Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Tony Schick in Eugene, KDLG’s Molly Dischner and Dave Bendinger in Dillingham, KTOO’s Matt Miller in Juneau, and KIYU’s Tim Bodony in Galena.
http://kmxt.org/2016/05/alaska-fisheries-report-19-may-2016/

State, trying to spare kings, says no gillnets on the Kuskokwim
Alaska Dispatch News by Lisa Demer – May 19, 2016
BETHEL — The salmon season for the Kuskokwim River area again is starting with strict restrictions in a continuing effort to rebuild struggling king runs.
http://www.adn.com/alaska-news/rural-alaska/2016/05/18/kuskokwim-salmon-restrictions/

East Coast Fishery

The news is good’: Northern cod stocks slowly increasing
Northern cod biomass at highest rate since 1992
CBC News by Garrett Barry and Lukas Wall – May 19, 2016
The Atlantic cod stocks are returning, but there’s still a long way to go before a large-scale commercial fishery becomes viable again.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/cod-stocks-slowly-increasing-1.3588906

International

North Sea cod could gain sustainable seafood label
Press Association – May 19, 2016
North Sea cod could soon be back on the menu for shoppers and diners who care if their fish is sustainable, as an assessment begins to see if the stock is well managed.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-3599328/North-Sea-cod-gain-sustainable-seafood-label.html

Environment/Science

Scientists study steelhead for salmon’s secrets
How do salmon find their way home? Some researchers are trying to figure whether out if they’re following friends.
KDLG by Molly Dischner – May 18, 2016
Each summer, millions of fish return to Bristol Bay, and then swim on to the stream where they were born to spawn, and die. Exactly what compels them to return to the right spot is unknown. But scientists think that some hatchery-raised steelhead in Oregon might hold a clue.
http://kdlg.org/post/scientists-study-steelhead-salmons-secrets#stream/0

Village, industry partner to fund Igushik Tower for 2016 season
KDLG by Dave Bendinger – May 19, 2016
Igushik Tower at Amanka Lake latest in string of Bristol Bay management operations that private partners have stepped in to fund after state cuts.
http://kdlg.org/post/village-industry-partner-fund-igushik-tower-2016-season

Measuring Up Crab Houdinis
KCUB by Greta Mart – May 20, 2016
Daily since late April, researchers have made their way to the end of A dock at Unalaska’s Carl E. Moses boat harbor. There they pull up a series of people-sized circular nets – sort of like Japanese paper hanging lanterns – and peer inside.
http://kucb.org/post/measuring-crab-houdinis

A Little Camera May Yield Big Results
NOAA – May 2016
Echogram image at Kodiak Island, Alaska on 16 March 2016.  The vertical axis represents depth and horizontal axis represents distance along the ship track.  The thick, dark red line along the entire lower portion of the echogram represents the seafloor.  Note the particularly high vertical relief including a pinnacle located at the left side of the echogram.  Fish backscatter in the vicinity of these types of rugged seafloor features is ideally suited for sampling with MiniCam (see text below).  The blue-green scattering represents pre-spawning pollock, which can form very dense aggregations (red layer) often near the seafloor.
http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/News/mini_camera.htm?utm_source=Pole+camera&utm_campaign=pole+camera&utm_medium=email

FYI’s

Fishy business: Ketchikan artist Ray Troll thrives on creatures of the sea
Alaska Dispatch News by Steve Quinn – May 15, 2016
KETCHIKAN — Something odd is happening in Ketchikan Creek, and Ray Troll needs to check it out. The pink salmon — or humpies — he’s accustomed to seeing spawn have been replaced by chum, also known as dogs.
http://www.adn.com/article/20160515/fishy-business-ketchikan-artist-ray-troll-thrives-creatures-sea

 

Ann Owens
Pacific Seafood Processors Association
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May 20, 2016