Friday, December 7, 2018

December 7, 2018

Alaska/Pacific Coast

Alaska Board of Fisheries rejects permit stacking, expands subsistence opportunity near Dillingham
Subsistence users near Dillingham can dip net this summer, and they can catch fish any time they like because the Board of Fisheries voted to remove a schedule that restricted subsistence fishing in the area to three days per week during peak sockeye season.
KDLG by Avery Lill - December 7, 2018
The Alaska Board of Fisheries Bristol Bay Finfish met last week in Dillingham. The board meets every three years to modify regulations for subsistence, commercial and sport fishing in the region.
https://www.kdlg.org/post/alaska-board-fisheries-rejects-permit-stacking-expands-subsistence-opportunity-near-dillingham


International
ASMI requests federal aid to cushion losses in US-China trade war
Seafood Source by Brian Hagenbuch - December 7, 2018
The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI) is crossing its fingers that its request goes through for several million dollars in federal aid to defray costs of the trade war between U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration and China.
https://www.seafoodsource.com/news/supply-trade/asmi-requests-federal-aid-to-cushion-losses-in-us-china-trade-war


Environment/Science
New DNA tool 'changes everything in marine science'
With eDNA, or environmental DNA, scientists can count fish and other animals just by collecting a small sample of water.
National Geographic by Stephen Leahy - December 3, 2018
Take a cup of water from any river, lake, or oceanside beach and environmental DNA fingerprinting can reveal which species of fish were recently swimming there. It used to take a lab a month or more to get those results, but now a new tool can identify a specific species in three days or less. That could be a gamechanger for science.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/12/edna-environmental-dna-counts-fish-changes-marine-science/?fbclid=IwAR1Pbug4wb1BguXoVrQEpzKzjKboeyCfj4JsR_3hW4OhKDfeZ0PmU4RpuRU


FYI’s
Exit interview with outgoing ASMI Executive Director Alexa Tonkovich
Seafood Source by Cliff White - December 5, 2018 
Last month, Alexa Tonkovich, the executive director of the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI) announced she would be relinquishing her position in order to pursue a master’s degree in international business in London, U.K.
https://www.seafoodsource.com/news/supply-trade/exit-interview-with-outgoing-asmi-executive-director-alexa-tonkovich

Dunleavy: no ‘preferred choice’ to lead ADFG
Alaska Journal of Commerce Elizabeth Earl - December 5, 2018
Newly-inaugurated Gov. Mike Dunleavy has tapped Doug Vincent-Lang to temporarily head the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and a spokesman said he intends to let the nomination process by the boards of Fisheries and Game lead the way to select a commissioner rather than announcing his own choice.
https://www.alaskajournal.com/2018-12-05/dunleavy-no-%E2%80%98preferred-choice%E2%80%99-lead-adfg#.XAqYMidRc0p

The Salmon Sisters land on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list
National Fisherman by Monique Coombs - December 4, 2018
The Salmon Sisters, Emma Teal Laukitis and Claire Neaton, have been busy since they were first featured on the cover of National Fisherman in September 2016. Most recently, they were awarded a spot on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list under the category of Leveraging Business Smarts to Save the World.
https://www.nationalfisherman.com/alaska/the-salmon-sisters-land-on-forbes-30-under-30-list/


In Memoriam
Glacier Fish Founder Erik Breivik Dies in Seattle
Seafood News by John Sackton - December 6, 2018
Erik Breivik, one of the pioneers of the Alaska groundfish industry, has died in Seattle. Breivik was born in Norway in 1941, and was a fishermen all his life.  In the late 1970's he and his partner John Song brought over a vessel they named the Royal Sea, which began fishing in Alaska in 1980. In 1982 he co-founded Glacier Fish, with the building of the Northern Glacier in Tacoma. Glacier went on to become one of the largest offshore harvesters of cod and pollock, and pioneered at-sea processing in Alaska.

In a statement, NFI president John Connelly said: "The seafood community has lost another pioneer. A giant in the groundfish world, Erik Breivik was the founder of Glacier Fish and a pioneer in Bering Sea fisheries. Affectionately known as 'The Viking,' Breivik brought the dedication and skill of a Norwegian fisherman to Alaska’s icy waters."

"Eric Breivik continued that global perspective as he built customers for Alaska pollock and other North Pacific seafood around world. He was direct, honest and intelligent, qualities that made him a superb executive, a visionary fishermen, and a devoted father. He will be missed by those in the global groundfish business and beyond."

Eric was well known for his philanthropy in Seattle, and was honored in 2017 by the Nordic Heritage Museum.
https://www.seafoodnews.com/Story/1125458/Glacier-Fish-Founder-Erik-Breivik-Dies-in-Seattle
 

Ann Owens
Pacific Seafood Processors Association
Office Manager
1900 W Emerson Place Suite 205, Seattle, WA 98119
Phone: 206.281.1667
E-mail: pspafish@gmail.com; Website: www.pspafish.net
Our office days/hours are Monday-Friday
8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

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