ECONOMY

INVESTING IN OUR FUTURE

GROWING STATE AND NATIONAL ECONOMIES

30,176

employed Alaska

residents

$4.7 billion

in first wholesale value from Alaska seafood

1 million

metric tons of seafood 

exported annually from
Alaska

A LONGSTANDING

 INDUSTRY

The seafood industry is one of the largest employment drivers in Alaska, directly employing 62,200 people and creating an additional 10,500 secondary jobs.

 

The seafood industry directly employs more workers than any other private sector industry in Alaska, with rural areas the most economically dependent.

Harvesting 5 to 6 billion pounds of seafood each year produces significant economic benefits for Alaska coastal communities, hundreds of support businesses, and thousands of Alaskans.

BRINGING JOBS TO ALASKA 

PSPA-AK-Map_sarah-L-2CROP3.jpg

Produced by McKinley Research Group 2022

The Alaska processing sector employs 27,100 workers, including 6,568 Alaska residents (2019).

Seafood processing is the largest manufacturing sector in Alaska, accounting for 70% of Alaska’s manufacturing employment and $1.8 billion in labor income in Alaska.

Nationally, the Alaska seafood industry creates an estimated 100,000 FTE jobs, $6 billion in annual labor income, and $15 billion in economic output.

IMPACTS

AND INVESTMENT

Investment by fishermen, processors, and the state is necessary to sustain the industry, increase the value of Alaska’s fisheries, remain competitive globally, and preserve the thousands of jobs, hundreds of local businesses, and millions in tax revenue that are tied to the seafood industry.

 

Some forces affecting the value of Alaska’s seafood resource are outside of state and industry control. On-going investment in infrastructure, marketing, and management are essential in growing the value of Alaska and Pacific Northwest seafood.

GENERATING

LONG-TERM VALUE

Alaska’s commercial fisheries have produced over 184 billion pounds since statehood. The industry produces enough seafood each year to feed everybody in the world at least one serving of Alaska seafood (12.7 billion servings annually) and is a testament to Alaska’s sustainable approach to fisheries management.

 

Managing sustainable fisheries in-season to optimize harvest requires a commitment to data collection and analysis. Stock assessments, surveys, and at-sea and shoreside monitoring provide valuable data for fisheries managers, which enable more precision in setting sustainable harvest levels and optimizing economic value of the fisheries.