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Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Alaska/Pacific Coast

Say goodbye to yelloweye: Southeast Alaska waters closed to harvest of rockfish species KCAW by Robert Woolsey - January 10, 2020 Fishing for a popular species of rockfish has been closed for the entire year in Southeast Alaska. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game closed the sport, commercial, and personal use fisheries for yelloweye rockfish effective 12:01 a.m. on January 1. https://www.ktoo.org/2020/01/10/say-goodbye-to-yelloweye-southeast-alaska-waters-closed-to-harvest-of-rockfish-species/ Study finds Tongass, Chugach ‘forest fish’ contribute one-quarter of Alaska salmon harvest KCAW News - January 13, 2020 A recently-published 10 year study estimates the value of what the Tongass and Chugach National Forests contribute to Alaska’s commercial salmon industry — and the numbers are sizeable. https://www.kcaw.org/2020/01/13/study-finds-tongass-chugach-forest-fish-contribute-one-quarter-of-alaska-salmon-harvest/ International Russia to Remain Major Supplier of Crab to Chinese Market Within Next Several Years SeafoodNews.com by Eugene Gerden - January 13, 2020 Russia will remain the major supplier of crab to the Chinese market within the next several years, despite the attempts of some other global producers to strengthen their foothold in it. Ivan Mikhnov, president of Antey Group of companies, one of Russia’s largest crab producers, told the Russian Tass business daily that Russia will be able to maintain its leading positions in the Chinese crab market in the coming years, despite the ever growing pressure from some major competitors. Ivan Mikhnov commented: "If we take the dynamics of the Chinese market, the growth rate of crab consumption in China will be growing from 20 to 40% annually within the next several years. According to data of the Chinese Customs Service, crab imports to the country grew from 1.500 tons in 2015 to 10,000 tonnes in 2018. It is expected in 2019 this figure will exceed 13,000 tonnes." According to Mikhnov, Russia only has a few competitors in the Chinese crab market. Its current domination on it could be also explained by the close-proximity of the territories of both countries to each other. In addition, prices for Russian crab in China are significantly lower than its alternatives which are supplied from the US, Argentina, Australia and other countries. Analysts also predict that demand for crabs in China will continue to grow in the coming years, and that will provide additional opportunities for growth to its major global exporters. At the same time, in regard to Japan and South Korea, the countries — which in recent years have also become among the major export destinations for Russian crab — will continue to be primarily involved in the reselling of crabs to the same Chinese market during the next several years. https://www.seafoodnews.com/Story/1161372/Russia-to-Remain-Major-Supplier-of-Crab-to-Chinese-Market-Within-Next-Several-Years Environment/Science Sound Science: Making a case for herring research Cordova Times by Teal Barmore - January 13, 2020 The Prince William Sound Science Center’s herring researchers have been working to compile a synthesis of existing information about Prince William Sound herring for the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council. https://www.thecordovatimes.com/2020/01/13/sound-science-making-a-case-for-herring-research/ Labeling and Marketing 3MMI - New Year Buyer’s Update: Pacific Salmon TradexFoods - January 13, 2020 --- As we head into the new year, salmon prices are taking a downwards trend as plants are trying to get rid of their 2019 inventories. Due to high demand, 4-6lb Alaskan Sockeye is starting to dry up, while smaller sized 2-4 lb fillets are still highly abundant. Alaskan Pinks have had been struggling to compete with their Russian counterparts, as prices on Russian Pinks are much lower. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=02wcwRcZK4Q&feature=emb_logo FYI’s NOAA celebrating Golden Anniversary throughout 2020 NOAA - January 13, 2020 NOAA is kicking off a year-long celebration to mark its upcoming 50th anniversary. Since its inception on October 3, 1970, NOAA has become one of the world’s premier science agencies that protects life and property, leads stewardship of the ocean and Great Lakes, and drives the blue economy — a mission that spans from the surface of the sun to the floor of the ocean. https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-celebrating-golden-anniversary-throughout-2020

Ann Owens Pacific Seafood Processors Association Office Manager 1900 W Emerson Place Suite 205, Seattle, WA 98119 Phone: 206.281.1667 E-mail: admin@pspafish.net; Website: www.pspafish.net Our office days/hours are Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is distributed under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. *Inclusion of a news article, report, or other document in this email does not imply PSPA support or endorsement of the information or opinion expressed in the document.

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